Episode 12: Bioshock Infinite Impressions, GDC & More

Brian and Drew are at it again. This week they discuss their initial impressions of Bioshock Infinite (a few hours in) as well as some news from GDC including what’s new with the PS4 as well as some new titles.

Episode 12

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Episode 11: SXSW Recap and Tomb Raider Thoughts

Drew and Brian are back at it this week. Brian has some news about what all went down at SXSW Screenburn Arcade. There are also quite a few updates on games that have come out and games to come like Bioshock Infinite.

Episode 11

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Take a Journey

ThatGameCompany, makers of FlOw and FlOwer have done it again, and this time they pulled out all the stops and have created what can really not be described any way other than masterful.

Journey is a game about, well, a journey. You are a wanderer, working your way towards a mountain in the distance for reasons that you as the player figure out for yourself. You see, there is undoubtedly a story being told in Journey, but that story really takes shape based on how you, the player, perceive it. Journey’s story can mean many things to many people–like any other form of art with which you can interact.

Just as a movie, a song, or a painting can speak to the audience, Journey speaks to the player on a variety of levels. With no words, ambient music, and a vast, beautiful, yet simple landscape, Journey’s setting opens itself up to a multitude of interpretations. Gameplay consists mainly of you moving your wanderer through the level and towards the mountainous goal, it is very simple and elegant and will keep you moving forward.

The gameplay is also shared with another player. You meet players in Journey, yet you are not aware of who you are meeting. Instead you are seamlessly matched up with another player and the two of you work through the “chapters” of the story together. You help each other find the way, and there are a few nuances to be discovered of how your wanderer can interact with your companion. It is only after the credits that Journey lets you in on who it was that accompanied you through your journey.

I definitely understand how my personal experiences and knowledge shaped what I took away from this game, and that is what makes it such a masterpiece. It has the power to truly move the player and really bring out an emotional reaction. At the same time, playing the game is fun, simple, and the short length (around 2 hours) means that you could play it over and over if you so choose, or simply play a single chapter, perhaps to help a stranger through a difficult part of the journey.

I would love to hear from everyone who has played this game. What was your experience? What was the goal toward which you believe you were working? What does this game say to you?

I think me wanting to know the answers to these questions speaks volumes about the game and the conversation it creates. ThatGameCompany truly has something special here, and if you haven’t played this game already, you simply must.

I understand our scale sort of breaks down with games that can only be purchased, but long story short, I cannot recommend this game any more highly, and with a pricetag of only $15 (plus the discounts often run on it and the PS Plus discount for it) you are really missing out if you choose to let this one pass you by without tagging along.

Journey is worth a BUY

Episode 10: Journey and SimCity Fiasco

This week Drew and Brian are back at it talking about Journey and the emotional reaction of video games as well as the SimCity launch fiasco. They also hit on some more features of the next generation and the plethora of great games that are coming out this month.

Episode 10

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